Cannabis Facts

United States Patent 6630507 | Cannabinoids as Antioxidants and Neuroprotectants | source: http://tokesignals.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/US-PatentTrademarkOffice-Seal.pngThe next time someone tries to tell you that medical marijuana is bunk and that all those potheads should be locked up, point them to US Patent #6630507: Cannabinoids as Antioxidants and Neuroprotectants (filed April 1998). The US Patent Office has accepted that cannabis has medical use, shouldn’t the DEA?

 

US Patent 6630507 and the Controlled Substances Act

The Controlled Substances Act, which is the driving force behind all DEA & US Attorney action against state marijuana laws has marijuana as a Schedule I substance (along with heroin). Schedule I substances are well defined as substances with:

  1. High potential for abuse
  2. No current accepted medical use in the United States
  3. Lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision

A substance must meet all three criteria to be designated as Schedule I in the Controlled Substances Act… except for cannabis. Cannabis/marijuana sadly remains on the list because President Nixon didn’t want those war protesting hippies on the White House lawn (he also didn’t trust the Jews on marijuana), so they added marijuana to the list of Schedule I substances so that they could start arresting and removing folks who were anti-war. The irony is that Nixon’s own National Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse report (Shafer Commission) suggested marijuana decriminalization and allowing for adult cultivation of cannabis.

Now marijuana has been a Schedule I substance for over 40 years and we’re finding that we have to defend why it shouldn’t be Schedule I rather than having a rational debate about what should be a Schedule I substance (after thousands of years of use as a human medicine). This debate has become akin to the argument of faith for many people, there’s just no changing people’s minds, even in the face of facts people just want to believe what they’ve been told their whole lives is true.

Contradictions Between US Patent #6630507 and Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act

Those of us who regularly use cannabis know know that marijuana does not have a high potential for abuse (or addiction). As comedian Doug Benson said, when you run out of weed, the withdrawal symptoms amount to… “bummer, I’m out of weed”. Of course the science can be debated about cannabis addictions, but the real reason that the science can be debated is that scientists are not allowed to study cannabis because it’s a Schedule I substance (do you see the circular logic here?).

To add insult to injury, the US Patent Office issued patent #6630507 in October 2003 to Aidan J. Hampson, Julius Axelrod, and Maurizio Grimaldi which describes how cannabinoids have antioxidant and neuroprotectant properties, clearly an acceptable medical use. The DEA has yet to acknowledge this fact.

Please share this patent with anyone who smokes weed.

United States Patent 6630507: Cannabinoids as Antioxidants and Neuroprotectants

US Patent 6630507 Abstract

Cannabinoids have been found to have antioxidant properties, unrelated to NMDA receptor antagonism. This new found property makes cannabinoids useful in the treatment and prophylaxis of wide variety of oxidation associated diseases, such as ischemic, age-related, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The cannabinoids are found to have particular application as neuroprotectants, for example in limiting neurological damage following ischemic insults, such as stroke and trauma, or in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and HIV dementia. Nonpsychoactive cannabinoids, such as cannabidoil, are particularly advantageous to use because they avoid toxicity that is encountered with psychoactive cannabinoids at high doses useful in the method of the present invention. A particular disclosed class of cannabinoids useful as neuroprotective antioxidants is formula (I) wherein the R group is independently selected from the group consisting of H, CH3, and COCH3.

View the full text of US Patent 6630507 on Google → 

19 comments
Constantine
Constantine

KannaLife Sciences Inc. was given an exclusive license by the US Dept. of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health on November of 2011 to US Patent 6630507 "Cannabinoids as Antioxidants and Neuroprotectants". I just saw Dr. Sanjay Gupta's series WEED 2 on CNN and there was no mention of this at all. http://www.kannalife.com

Ceetje
Ceetje

Coincidence? 3+0+5+0+7= 15, 1+5 = 6, patent 666?

Geralyn
Geralyn

so if this is true then that has to null and void the new law that went into effect in Michigan that you can't have oils or other products made from shade leaves and so on. Federal Law overrides state law according to them.

beansdad
beansdad

Sorry to be a jonny come lately, just found out about the patent information. If this is not the height of hypocrisy, I do not know what could be. Been waiting 40 yrs for some fair treatment, then find the Gov. has had a patent on the effects for 10 yrs, yet it is still a schedule 1... Go figure...

Old Hippie
Old Hippie

It's been brought to my attention that this article left out the very important point that it''s not just the Patent Office that recognizes this fact. "The United States Government" is specifically named as the OWNER of the patent! For more information, see http://beyondchronic.com/2011/10/5-biggest-myths-... Nugs and hugs!

agnar150
agnar150

The DEA is like priests they just sit round and do nothing good for humans

Raymond 'Dinobl
Raymond 'Dinobl

I'm confused...aren't you not supposed to be able to patent something that exists naturally?

Redneck Packrat
Redneck Packrat

You can patent a derivative with a specific use, I think. Kinda like patented solvents that are derivatives of crude oil....

Cameron Cech
Cameron Cech

The BRCA1 and BRCA 2 genes (the genes used to determine succeptibility to breast cancer) are both patented by a company. Research isn't even allowed on the "natural" genes.

Lakota Weedist
Lakota Weedist

I'm no patent attorney (maybe someone else can explain the nuances to us?), but it appears that they are focused on patenting the "novel use" of the cannabinoid. To your point, it's not so novel to folks that have used cannabis like ourselves. I'm guessing there's not a lot of Weedists in the US Patent Office.

n8wolf
n8wolf

Mansanto just won their SCOTUS case so technically, you can.

Lakota Weedist
Lakota Weedist

This is a bit different, the Monsanto thing they genetically engineered Soybeans so that they resist RoundUp. So the farmers plant the genetically modified seed and then spray their whole field with RoundUp... Only the Franken-Soybeans survive. Pretty scary stuff considering what RoundUp does to other plants! http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/05/13/18...

trad farmer
trad farmer

Hi Troy, New studies have shown that RoundUp is really bad. Really bad. Stay healthy and informed.

Geralyn
Geralyn

try full strength white vinegar really soak the ground and let it sit for a day or two all the weed will be dead and it helps to level out the ph in the soil.

Troy Darling
Troy Darling

round up just fills the receptor for a needed plant nutrient so the plant cant take it in and dies... nothing sinister about round up..simple chemistry

Stephen Stillwell
Stephen Stillwell

The other plants are developing a resistance to RoundUp, so you need more RoundUp.